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Thursday, July 28, 2022

Color


Although he definitely took some full frontal nudes of certain models during the time it 
was officially illegal to do so, Chuck Renslow's photos of Mike Bradburn appear to be two 
distinct groups.  All the photos of him in my collection where he looks younger and leaner are 
posing strap or semi-nude, while the full frontal shots show a beefier and likely older model.

 

4 comments:

  1. I am impressed with the very subtle colour of this image - for its day. Cabin in the Woods was clearly shot in black and white. Is that rather good image you posted the colourized version? Because the colours there in the version I have are equally subdued. I don't know what the professionals used, but we mostly used Kodak and Agfa film for amateur use in this country. It was very contrasted. I had a cousin who used to do colour drawings of plants and trees for gardening books and encyclopaedia because colour photography to publication was very poor until perhaps as late as the 1980s.

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    1. You bring up an interesting and puzzling subject, Julian. I don't have the technical expertise to recognize when something has been digitally colorized, so I'm often left wondering. I've long suspected that some of the original photos might have been done in both ways, but I don't know how that would have worked with the technology they had then. I can usually spot the super saturated tones of Kodachrome, fwiw, but beyond that . . .

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  2. You bring up a good point about the whole color issue. Older color film processing involved a 3 step process that went thru each primary color stage. But, the beautiful saturated colors you saw on the movie screen didn’t always work in print. It was, and still is, an easy process to “de-colorize” a print. And sun/UV light will degrade any photo, black and white and color.

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  3. To me it looks as it were done at the time. But then again, a lot of old images have been colorized.

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