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Friday, November 11, 2022

Vietnam


Vietnam.  What can anyone say that hasn't been said?

 

18 comments:

  1. What a wonderful series! Thank you, Veterans. And thank you, Jerry, for posting this.

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  2. Perhaps "Never again" - but I fear no one is listening. That image, so carefully and respectfully chosen, seems to sum up the Vietnam War without need of words.

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  3. This was an interesting as well as moving memorial series. Thank you.

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  4. What an extraordinarily poignant photo! The whole series was wonderful! Thank you Jerry.

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  5. I made sure to come here today because you always do right by veterans. You are a true prince.

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    1. The very least I could do. Thanks for your kind words, Leroy.

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  6. A very moving image.
    When I was a little kid, we visited relatives at their apartment. A woman lived there who's only son was serving in Viet Nam. One day we kids were playing in the alleyway and one of those military staff cars pulled up to her apartment.
    The screams and crying we heard afterward, I'll never forget.
    The landlady, my granma, aunt and some other ladies went over to the apartment to console that greif stricken mother. What can you say, there are no words. Viet Nam has left a deep scar. I wish more veterans would go back to South East Asia while their still here, some have and they've done commendable and inspiring work opening clinics,schools, improving lives etc. For others its confronting personal demons, calling out when something is said that was not true,finding their own personal truth, a final goodbye to a brother-soldier or at least some modicum of closure..-rj/ie

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    1. There's a scene much like you describe in the movie "Across the Universe." It's a great movie about the era set to the music of the Beatles.

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  7. Here is the lot of the soldier as noted by Kipling

    It’s Tommy this and Tommy that, and toss him out the brute.
    But he’s the hero of his country when the guns begin to shoot.

    Two of my brothers served in Viet Nam. One a Marine, the other Army. Thankfully they both survived without lasting physical or mental damage.
    My wife and I did our time in the Air Force after the war at March AFB in Riverside, CA. She was in weather equipment repair. I was a veterinary specialist.

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    1. You and your family were fortunate. I had a high school classmate who was killed . . . in a freak accident, not combat.

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    2. Both parents were veterans of both Korea and Vietnam. Interesting times and viewpoints from each parent. One of the few good things to come out of the Nixon era was his making military service all voluntary. The hope that photos like wouldn’t happen again unfortunately didn’t last.

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    3. One of my college history professors was an advisor to LBJ during the "escalation" of the Vietnam War. He quit before LBJ left office to return to academia and told us that Johnson was terrified of "being the first U.S. president to lose a war." We all know how that turned out.

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