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Sunday, August 22, 2021

Barrington Double Feature, Part 2 - Publication Covers


John Paignton Barrington engaged in a wide array of publishing ventures, ranging from the usual 50s and 60s legal magazines to coffee table books to compilations to art and photography lessons.  Part two or our double feature will look at his cover photos for some of these.  We start with the December, 1967 edition of Young Guys which features model Tibor Nosky, sometimes spelled Noszkay.  The quality level in this one is a carryover from Part One, but it goes downhill from here as you'll see.

 

6 comments:

  1. Jerry, not being familiar with these mags, can I ask if the men were ever shown full frontal inside?

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    1. It would depend on where and when they were published. In general terms, things loosened up in the USA and UK in the late 1960s.

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  2. This is excellent quality for a Barrington publication. Apparently he was turning magazines out at a furious rate with quality pretty low down on the list of priorities.

    I've really enjoyed this series, Jerry. Not least - as I mentioned elsewhere - I've just read Rupert Smith's biography of Barrington. If a writer came up with a character like Barrington it would almost certainly be described as fanciful and unlikely. He definitely had an eventful life.

    Peter

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    1. Did Mr. Smith mention Barrington have been involved in the black market after or during World War II. I seem to remember reading somewhere that he got into trouble for that.

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    2. Yes. During the war Barrington became involved with brothers Bob and Frank Wellington as a Director of Peronia Cosmetics who rebottled cheap perfume into bottles spray painted and labelled with forged brand names. Barrington's role was to sign and date occasional receipts and he turned a blind eye to the brothers financial misdemeanours. HM Customs and Excise started investigations into tax evasion in January 1945 which eventually led to an Old Bailey trial in November 1946. Charges against the Wellington brothers were dropped due to insufficient evidence but Barrington was found guilty and sentenced to 12 months in prison and made personally liable to Customs for £2,100. He ended up serving 11 months in Wandsworth and Pentonville Prisons and managed to defer payment of the money to Customs and Excise.

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    3. OK, that's it. I even remember cosmetics or such being involved. Thanks!

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