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Tuesday, May 19, 2020

Furballs on the Phone


Today's theme is hairy guys on the phone, and we start with this broadly smiling model.
Those headboards are making a comeback these days in lah-ti-dah bedroom furniture, btw.
Edited to add:  Many thanks to the_cham_cham for identifying Peter Chamberlin.

11 comments:

  1. Peter Chamberlain. Has nice hairy legs and(though not showing here so much) a pair of low hangers.

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  2. Ah yes, the days of yore when telephones were used to talk to people.

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  3. Très belle série d'hommes poils, Jerry!! Tu sais combien j'aime ça !!!!
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    Very nice series of furry men, Jerry !! You know how much I like it !!!!

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    1. Yes, I know my dear Belgian friend's tastes well by now!

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  4. Joseph Brian ScottMay 19, 2020 at 3:32 PM

    He has a great smile, seems very genuine.

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    1. Yes, one of the best in the business, and that's saying a lot.

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  5. What’s a rotary phone? Maybe Peter can answer.

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    1. A rotary telephone is a telephone where you had to dial the number by sliding your finger through the hole in the voluptuous digit and rotating it to a stop. A spring then brought the dial back to its initial position to know how to form the second digit then the third ... it seems complicated like that, but it was quite short ...

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  6. Some telephone talk... Language changes far faster than most of us realize. Only a century ago, people didn't use the word "zero" but "naught". In American English, counting dropped the "and" customary in other parts of the Anglosphere, as in "three hudred, twenty-five" instead of "three hundred AND twenty-five" customary elsewhere. In all parts of the English-speaking world, the year 1904 was rendered "19,4" not the "19 0 4" of today, with the "zero" pronounced as in the letter "O". Why did this happen? It is in fact one of the first examples of technology affecting language. The telephone was invented by Alexander Bell - a British immigrant to Boston, MA - in 1876, carrying the voice over copper wires... The very narrow bandwidth tended to mash certain combinations of vowels and consonants known in linguistics as "phonemes". Such was the case with "one" and "naught" which over the telephone sounded more like indistinguishable grunts - exaggerated all the more when a man was speaking in a lower register, which also explains why telephone "operators" were women. So a telephone jargon developed where, exceptionally, the "naught" was rendered as the letter "O". Other words got mashed as well... When I was a boy, our home telephone number was Solihull 0738, which didn't stop the international operator dialing us rather than the Mormon church in neighbouring Selly Oak with calls from Salt Lake City overnight. At least the Oh, seven, three, eight worked. Hooray for Subscriber Trunk Dialing. The jargon entered into popular usage and so today, we say "19 Oh 4" on a regular basis. Narrow bandwidth also gave Houston a problem where "Yes" and "No" and even a naval "Aye" sounded identical and resulted in the phenomenon known as "NASAspeak" where the Apollo astronauts started to use "Affirmative" and "Negative"... as in:

    Mission Control: Can you see the aliens?

    Neil Armstrong: Affirmative, they're parked on the side of the crater.

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