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Thursday, April 16, 2020

Muybridge



The work of Eadweard Muybridge (yes, he at least partially made up the name) never ceases to fascinate me.  His pioneering motion studies set the stage for what we now call the movies.  We start with a young man who seems to be saying,  "Yeah, it was this big."

7 comments:

  1. J'aime beaucoup le corps de cet homme!!! En particulier ce qu'il nous présente entre ses jambes, c'est gros, poilu, tout ce que j'aime...
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    I really like this man's body !!! In particular what he presents to us between his legs is big, hairy, everything that I like ...

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  2. Delightful model..love to do this..

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  3. Wish I could send a message through time to tell Muybridge and this model how wonderful their photo is.
    Nick

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    1. It is indeed amazing to be looking at this young man 132 years later and marveling at him. He will always be beautiful, and that's why I do this.

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    2. These stunning young men have become immortal.

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  4. Yes, Eadweard Muybridge changed his name to the Anglo-Saxon or Old English spelling. The Victorians were much taken with the Anglo-Saxons, largely as a result of the Great Reform Acts of the period which widened the suffrage and saw the birth of democracy. The Anglo-Saxons had a more or less classless society and elected their kings - the last King of the English to be elected was Harold II Godwinson, who was killed in the Battle of Hastings in 1066. Eadweard was born in Kingston-upon-Thames - formerly in the county of Surrey, now the sprawl that is Greater London - which was in Roman times the siting of the first bridge over the River Thames outside London. The name derives from the Anglo-Saxon Cyninges tun (the king's manor or estate) and was England's first royal borough. The town was on the border between the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of Wessex and Mercia but was most famous for being the traditional site for the crowning of Anglo-Saxon kings of a united England on the Coronation stone, which still exists in the town today, although not in its original place. Eadweard was clearly steeped in the local history as much as his photography, examples of which can be seen in the town's museum.

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    1. I knew he had changed the spelling of his name, but didn't know the historical details. Thanks.

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