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Friday, July 15, 2022

Ken Suffolk, aka Mr. Scumbeast


I began collecting vintage photos way back in the late 70s when I lived in New Orleans.  Decades later I decided to get serious about digital images and stumbled upon a French photo sharing website called Ipernity.  It was there that I encountered Miss Magnolia Thunderpussy, Philly Guy, Veronica P. Vanderbilt, and Mr. Scumbeast, aka Ken Suffolk, 1949-2016.  Ken was one of those magical people who managed to not only amass a vast collection of vintage photos of all types, but to share it generously with others.  As you will see, his tastes were very broad.  I was overwhelmed by the sheer volume of his offerings and only acquired a portion of them.  Fortunately the entire collection has been preserved, but it is not available on line at this time.  Today, I pay homage to a man who was not only a generous benefactor, but a dear friend.  I miss him terribly.  Those of you who are so kind as to thank me for my work on the blog should know who made it possible.

 

6 comments:

  1. RIP Mr. Thank you, and Thank you for you too, Mr Vintage, im glad i found this blog, that i can enjoy the art of nudity of male in classic vision even for free. I hope you always happy and healthy! I know we just talk in blog world but you're my friend in my head, sir! Thank you again!

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  2. I'm sorry for your loss, Jerry. It hurts to lose a friend.

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    1. Thanks, B.D. It helps to give him his due from time to time.

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  3. I remember the Ipernity days. It's hard to believe that it's been almost a decade since that time. It was one beautiful community of people interested in vintage male photos and willing to engage and comment on them. It was also an education, the first time I've ever put names to faces (and bodies). We users were also taught about each great photographers' quirks and trademarks, and how to decipher those cryptic icons on Bob Mizer's pics. And, of course, there was Miss Mag, always willing to teach everyone about tacky furniture and "either the drapes go or I do". Mr. Scumbeast was a constant presence, contributing some masterpieces to the collection. Ipernity itself was a key part of this, contributing an interface that allowed for easy communication, unlike Flickr (and it was a safe harbor after Flickr declared censorship).

    I don't think it can ever be replicated. The net's too different now and we're all older and just a bit more cynical. Jerry, you're doing a good job here keeping the spirit alive and I give you full credit. Thanks for doing this today. It's giving me a warm glow.

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    1. So nice to hear from someone who was there, so to speak. The amazing thing about Ken was his willingness to go above and beyond Ipernity by sharing photos and information via private email. He had a lot of amazing images that never appeared on the site, and his help with my family photos was done in a loving and sensitive way. Thanks so much for sharing your experience.

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